Vince Vaughn film offers no potential

The newest Vince Vaughn comedy “Unfinished Business” is not only a bad movie, it may be one of the worst movies an audience will ever see.  

After viewing this movie with only six other people in the theater, four of which left around half way through, there was an incredibly apparent problem.  

“Unfinished Business” is a movie that has no idea what it is, the film constantly struggles with its own genre.  

The film constantly juggles between a comedy, a drama and, oddly, a public service announcement against cyber bullying while managing to fail at all three simultaneously.

In the beginning of the film, audiences find Vince Vaughn in his stereotypical good man down-on-his-luck state. 

Within the first 10 minutes he quits his job and starts his own company with the help of Dave Franco (“21 Jump Street”) and Tom Wilkinson, (“Batman Begins”).  

After the movie’s set up, the plot goes haywire and the audience is expected to follow along the windy road of business jargon, family issues and forced humor.      

Humor manages to be Vince Vaughn and company’s worst enemy in this movie as every joke swings and misses.

The only laughable joke was the constant mentioning of Dave Franco’s character’s last name, which won’t be spoiled. Besides this one quality joke, “Unfinished Business” will stop at nothing to try to get the audience to chuckle. 

Eventually the film reaches that awkward point where they add nudity into the equation, only to again swing and miss, despite the many boobs and penises one will see.  

“Unfinished Business” is a blatantly non-humorous comedy and sadly no character has enough gusto to save the sinking ship.

The characters are another massive force working against the success of the film, even with the help of a supporting character, Mike, played by the always-charming Dave Franco.  

In fact, after seeing this film, his “always charming” title should be revoked as he plays the film’s worse character.  

When “Unfinished Business” introduces Mike he seems to be the lovable idiot, but after about 10 minutes he becomes a borderline offensive mentally-handicapped individual.  

His character is in-fact so dumb that his lines are often slurred for an attempted comedic moment, which never actually makes one laugh.  

This character, alongside the extremely dull Tim, played by two-time Academy Award nominee Tom Wilkinson, only pull “Unfinished Business” further away from being enjoyable.

Vince Vaughn’s character, Dan Trunkman, is surprisingly the film’s strongest aspect. 

He manages to remain the most human and relatable character that has serious commitment issues between the genres of drama and comedy.  

This is extremely prevalently at every voiceover where he continuously asks himself the question: “what kind of dad am I?” 

That is where the slightly uncomfortable cyber bullying subplot emerges, as his overweight son struggles with the mean kids at school the audience never sees.  

This PSA-like story is never fully resolved as Vaughn’s only solution to the problem is to tell his son that cyber-bullying will never stop so just deal with it, which proves the public service announcement ineffective.

“Unfinished Business” is just an awful movie that never has a high point amongst its many lows. 

Vaughn tries to save a dying film, but it’s obvious that even he can’t wiggle his way through this train wreck of a script. 

If given the choice between watching “Unfinished Business” or a DVD menu on repeat, the latter is recommended.