Sustainability Week brings a wake-up call 

The Sustainability Expo took place throughout Sonoma State University  and informed at least 1,000 students in a variety of different ways. There were talks, movies, tabling and art exhibits inspired by the topic of sustainability. 

 One did not have to venture to the Green Music Center in order to get information about sustainability because Residential Life and Campus Life set up shop inbetween the Student Center and Rec Center.

Emily Wirdzek was tabling on behalf of Residential Life. Throughout the week they tabled for about 16 hours in total and estimated talking to 400 to 500 students each day.

Besides giving away free stuff, they tabled and informed students with interesting facts depending on the topic for the day. The topics were alternative transportation, reusable bags/recycling, water conservation and finally alternative products. 

“A lot of people have been  shocked to find out how much water we use when we shower,” said Wirdzek. 

A normal showerhead uses approximately 50 gallons for a 10-minute shower. California is currently in a drought and it might be worth the effort to cut back on shower times and water usage when possible. 

“When I think of sustainability, I think of my future kids,” said Emily Wirdzek. “If we are not aware of how we use our resources now, then the consequences for the future generations could be detrimental.” 

Sustainability day was considered by many to be a success. 

Roughly 1,000 students were able to find time in their day to head to the Green Music Center and learn about sustainability. 

While the bulk of the presentation was done on Tuesday, there were different events and tabling on other parts of the campus. 

The main slogan was DOTT, which means “do one thing today.” Do One Thing Today is meant to inspire people to change small things in their daily routine. 

One can turn off the faucet while washing his or her hands or teeth, turn off those unused lights and  take quick showers. 

Dirty car? Do not worry about it so much, and ride a bike instead. It’s good for the environment, and the physical exercise is good for the body. 

“It doesn’t have to be a large change in what we do to make a huge difference,” said Taylor Millman, with Campus life.  

Millman spent part of her day tabling outside the Rec Center trying to reach students. She had made small changes in her life after being inspired by the sustainability expo. It took Millman and her associates at least a month and a half to prepare their presentations for tabling. 

“Sustainability means being conscience of the world around us, and of being aware of our impact to our surroundings,” said Millman. 

Beeta Vafaee, environmental studies major, is just one out of many students who attended the sustainability expo at the Green Music Center. 

She particularly enjoyed the art at the expo and thought it really captured the essence of the event. Also, she loved the free stickers. 

“A lot of students go out of their way to act on these issues and are passionate on their mission to make us more sustainable,” said Vafaee. 

The students Vafaee referred to are the many who put on the expo. 

Much of the information that was given was researched by students, planned by students and presented by students. 

These students worked hard for something that they are truly passionate about. 

Even though the expo is over, students like Vafaee and many others have the word sustainability etched into their heads, which might make readers think twice before taking 20-minute showers.